If Useless e-Services have bad security, does it matter?

tl;dr EURES is an EU e-governenment service where password resets are broken, and the support agents ask for your passwords and will happily delete any account given a username or e-mail address without any form of verification.

Some years back, I was job hunting. In good faith, I registered on EURES (the EURopean Employment Service).

The EURES service has never provided anything even remotely useful; I might have been approached about a job as a chimney sweep in Bulgaria once.

A Bollocks-free Enterprise Architecture Repository with Semantic Mediawiki

One of the biggest reasons there is so much bad software is that business schools pump out people who have been led to believe that the ability to draw diagrams is an acceptable substitute for the ability to read a line of code or assess a technical standard.

One prominent victim of this phenomenon is the whole area around enterprise architecture. Gartner calls it:

...the process of translating business vision and strategy into effective enterprise change by creating, communicating and improving the key requirements, principles and models that describe the enterprise's future state and enable its evolution

It's a clear enough definition and - as with everything Gartner - it doesn't help anyone accomplish much of anything. Not counting the dubious objective of creating a market for MBA graduates.

Here is my alternative definition of Enterprise Architecture. You are free to use this definition for any purpose, especially if you intend to tattoo it on your CIO's backside:

The systems we are responsible for are legion, they are heterogeneous, they are wicked, and they conspire. We wield the autocratic staff of Enterprise Architecture and it sheds light and builds highways (and occasionally bike paths). It fosters empathy for the whole in the heart of each subsystem.

On hiring good engineers

An interview with a Google HR person was brought to my attention. Apart from the fact that Google dehumanises their employees by calling this area "People Operations", the following quote was interesting:

On the hiring side, we found that brainteasers are a complete waste of time. How many golf balls can you fit into an airplane? How many gas stations in Manhattan? A complete waste of time. They don’t predict anything. They serve primarily to make the interviewer feel smart.

This seems fairly obvious to me, but technical candidates will probably have to live with this bankrupt assessment method for a while yet.

Subscribe to Josef Assad RSS